FIFA to pick 2023 Women’s World Cup host next month

ZURICH (AP) — The 2023 Women’s World Cup host will be picked by FIFA’s ruling council on June 25.

The contest is between Brazil, Japan, Colombia, and a joint bid from Australia and New Zealand.

In an open vote of the 37-member FIFA Council, the result of each round of balloting and each voter’s choice will be made public.

FIFA inspection teams visited the four bid candidates in January and February before international travel was restricted due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“FIFA is now finalizing the evaluation report, which will be published in early June,” FIFA said in a statement on Friday.

The 2023 World Cup will be the first to feature 32 teams. There were 24 at the 2019 edition won by the United States in France.

More AP soccer: https://apnews.Com/Soccer and https://twitter.Com/AP_Sports.

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